This past weekend I traveled with Mark Miller to an event where he spoke to a group of leaders about how to strengthen the teams in their organizations. He chose today’s topic: Community.

Although the concept of community is at the core of what creates  a High Performance Team, it is also one of the twelve best practices to unlock organizational performance.

When Mark and I wrote the Chess Not Checkers Field Guide, we addressed this essential element of true, sustainable high performance. The following is an excerpt from the guide…

Cropped shot of a group of businesspeople standing in a huddle with their hands piled up

Cropped shot of a group of businesspeople standing in a huddle with their hands piled up

When we see the word community, it may bring to mind rows of houses with white picket fences. However, what makes a neighborhood is not the homes, rather it is the neighbors … those we live with.

One of the differentiators between a good team and a great team is the decision to pursue genuine community. The same truth applies to organizations. The concept may feel soft, but don’t underestimate what it can do for your work environment. Many organizations are equal when it comes to talent and skills. However, the most talented don’t always win. Whether in sports or business, many squander their potential because they miss the power and competitive advantage of community.

Many historical examples of genuine community can be found in the military. Countless men and women have laid down their lives for countries and causes. However, a deeper look often shows, they really sacrificed for the friend by their side in the trench. There is, truly, power when a group decides to lock arms and pursue something great together. Does this idea characterize your culture?

High Performance Organizations create an atmosphere of caring. Not just about the work but also about each other. They think “we first, not me first.” Such a mindset is evidenced as they celebrate together, overcome setbacks, push and challenge one another, and even grieve when necessary. The way they care for each other creates a sense of togetherness that leads to more individual engagement and greater team results. If you truly want to build a great organization, choose to invest time on the task of building community. Remember, when a team comes together, they set themselves apart.

Leadership Begins at Home,

Randy

Are you leading your organization to think “we first?”

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Author: Randy

Randy is an author, speaker, executive coach, and the CEO of InteGREAT Leadership. He invests his time encouraging leaders around the world.