A while back I picked up my copy of Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People.

When it comes to working on my people skills, Carnegie’s classic is still one of my favorites.

One of the best reminders in the book is where Carnegie writes, “The unvarnished truth is that almost all the people you meet feel superior to you in some way, and a sure way to their hearts is to let them realize in some subtle way that you recognize their importance, and recognize it sincerely.”  He goes on, referring to what Emerson once said: “Every man I meet is my superior in some way. In that, I learn of him.”

I love those words so much because they keep me focused on the importance of other people. Great leaders think others first.

Unfortunately, I have a tendency to think me first. More than I care to admit, I default to my-self, my agenda, my success, and my dreams.

Carnegie’s reminder is not original to him. This idea was first written about a couple thousand years ago when Paul penned in his letter to the Philippian church, “In humility value others above yourselves.”

If you want to win friends and influence people, perhaps you should start by changing your focus.

Everyone you meet today will have tremendous value. The question is, will you exercise the humility to recognize it?

Leadership Begins at Home,

Randy

Who has added value to your life during the past month?

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Author: Randy

Randy is an author, speaker, executive coach, and the CEO of InteGREAT Leadership. He invests his time encouraging leaders around the world.