Who Cares?

One of my favorite authors, Patrick Lencioni, writes the following in his book, The Three Signs of a Miserable Job.

“A direct supervisor needs to take a genuine, personal interest in an employee in order to increase that employee’s satisfaction and fulfillment.”

Are your team members experiencing satisfaction and fulfillment in their jobs? If not, it might be because they don’t think you care about them.

Push yourself to care about their lives, not just their work, and watch how performance improves.

Leadership Begins at Home,

Randy

What is one way a leader can show intentional

interest in a team member?

Comment Below …

Leave a comment



Coach McAllister

9 years ago

I have heard from a reliable source….that this was the strength of Bobby Cox. That he genuinely cared about each of his players and in return, they played their hearts out for him.

Randy

9 years ago

I actually had a great conversation with a guy who played for Bobby for several years and he said the same thing Coach. Thanks for the comment!

Ronna Bush

9 years ago

So true…good thoughts!

Randy

9 years ago

Thanks RB

Mike

9 years ago

Yesterday I watched a seminar by Ken Blanchard on a similar topic titled “Quit and Stay”. Ironically, what I heard stated repeatedly during this seminar was the best way to prevent this infection from infiltrating your organization is to get and keep your people engaged. One of the best ways to engage your staff is to get to know them personally and understand what truly drives them and what issues they are dealing with, what distracts them. There is a balance here though that requires understanding, truth, and accountability.

Randy

9 years ago

Great comment Mike. Thanks!

Stephen LaFond

9 years ago

Great stuff! I try to engage with each and everyone of my associates each day. It makes it even harder when some of them are virtual, I have learned to pick up the phone instead of just firing off another email.
Thanks for the insight!

Randy

9 years ago

Thanks Stephen!

Jeremy Etress

9 years ago

An article I read this week seemed applicable when answering “Who Cares?” so I thought I would share!
The LORD God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it (Gen. 2:15).
Imagine for a moment that Jesus has just completed his three years of training with the disciples. He has been crucified and is now commissioning the twelve to go into the world and disciple the nations. Now imagine him also making this statement to them.
“Dear brothers, it is now time for you to share what you have learned from me. However, as you share with others be sure that you keep what I taught you separate from your work life. The principles I have shared with you only apply in situations outside your work life. Do not make them fit into this context. The miracles you saw in me can only be done in certain situations outside work life. Keep this in mind when thinking about praying for the sick or the lost. These truths will not work in the marketplace.”
Sound preposterous? It may, but this is the mindset of many in our world today. The spiritual does not mix with the everyday world of the workplace. “What happens on Monday has no relationship to what takes place on Sunday,” they say.
These are the thoughts expressed so much in our day and time, although they are not expressed in such direct terms. Let’s think more about this idea. When Jesus came to earth, how did He come? He came as a carpenter. He was a man given to work with his hands and to provide an honest service to his fellow man. He did not come as a priest, although He was both a King and a Priest (Rev. 1:6 KJV). When it came time to recruit those for whom the Church would be founded, He chose twelve men from the workplace – a fisherman, a tax collector, a doctor, and so on.
They all came from the workplace. None of his disciples were priests from the synagogue, a natural place to recruit from if you were going to start a religious movement. Jesus called them all from the marketplace of life. Was this any accident that Jesus called men and women from the marketplace to play such a vital role in His mission? I think not.
Today, embrace your work life as a holy calling.

Randy

9 years ago

Great input Jeremy!

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